"Mercouri G. Kanatzidis and Robert P. H. Chang, inorganic chemists and study authors, created new perovskite solar cells, but have replaced the harmful lead with cheaper, more environmentally friendly tin. The tin in the new perovskite cells absorbs the suns rays, and converts them into energy.

The Goliath Tiger Fish
“When your name is Goliath, you’d better be one humongous, ferocious creature, and the Goliath tigerfish (Hydrocynus goliath) definitely lives up to its moniker. A native of the Congo River basin, the Lualaba River, Lake Upemba and Lake Tanganyika in Africa, it’s the largest member of the tigerfish clan, a genus of fierce predators with protruding, daggerlike teeth. The biggest one on record was nearly 5 feet long and weighed 154 pounds, the equivalent of a super-welterweight prizefighter. And it outclasses other African game fish in speed and power.” Animal planet

The Goliath Tiger Fish
“When your name is Goliath, you’d better be one humongous, ferocious creature, and the Goliath tigerfish (Hydrocynus goliath) definitely lives up to its moniker. A native of the Congo River basin, the Lualaba River, Lake Upemba and Lake Tanganyika in Africa, it’s the largest member of the tigerfish clan, a genus of fierce predators with protruding, daggerlike teeth. The biggest one on record was nearly 5 feet long and weighed 154 pounds, the equivalent of a super-welterweight prizefighter. And it outclasses other African game fish in speed and power.” Animal planet

"While the new shape resembles a double helix the team noticed it had what they call perversions (see image above). Technically it is a hemihelix, a sort of helix that shifts from spiraling in a clockwise direction to an anticlockwise one, or vice versa. A change in direction is called a perversion. Darwin observed what we now call perversions in the tendrils of climbing plants that gain purchase on another object….In PloS ONE the team demonstrate that “the number of perversions depends on the height to width ratio of the strip’s cross-section.”

"Those bacteria are parasites. They live off of another species — the plant — while offering it no help. Through its tinkering with the plant to attract insect predators, “the parasite wins,” notes biologist Saskia Hogenhout. She studies plants and insect pests at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, England. Her team published a new study about the plant parasites April 8 in the journal PLOS Biology." Read the full article.